A Catsup of Another Color

Zapote Negro "catsup" served with fried makal.

A Catsup of Another Color

With its rich brown flesh and creamy texture it’s not surprising that, outside Mexico, zapote negro is often called “chocolate pudding fruit.”

Beneath its papery olive-green skin, you wouldn’t expect to find such a rich brown, pudding-like pulp. Nor would you likely feel inclined to choose one that’s properly ripe, all wizened, saggy and split!

It’s not sweet like chocolate pudding, but, like raw, natural cacao, zapote negro has an earthy and slightly floral flavor. It’s pleasant enough, but doesn’t make a big impression on its own.

Many Mexicans grew up enjoying this fruit as a creamy drink, blended with orange juice, a little sugar, and for the adults, a shot of tequila!

We decided to go the savory direction, and added a little spice and tang to make this catsup-like condiment.

 

What does it go well with?

We serve this catsup with crisped (roasted or fried) root vegetables like camote (sweet potato), makal (Mayan word referring to a tropical tuber)any of the many tubers that can be found in Mexico.

Give it a try, and let us know what you think!

 


 

Zapote Negro Catsup
Print Recipe
Serve this zesty condiment with root vegetable fries.
Servings Prep Time
4 servings as condiment 20 min
Servings Prep Time
4 servings as condiment 20 min
Zapote Negro Catsup
Print Recipe
Serve this zesty condiment with root vegetable fries.
Servings Prep Time
4 servings as condiment 20 min
Servings Prep Time
4 servings as condiment 20 min
Ingredients
Servings: servings as condiment
Instructions
  1. Crush all ingredients except naranja agria and water in a molcajete, with mortar and pestle*. Add naranja agria juice. Strain mixture into zapote negro pulp. Taste and add water to thin or neutralize flavor. Add salt if needed.
  2. *If you don't have a molcajete or mortar and pestle, blend all ingredients except the zapote negro together in a blender to make a runny paste.
Recipe Notes

This recipe was created for our "Cooking Plant Foods of the Yucatán" class series. If you're in Mérida (or planning to be)consider joining Erin Gomez Danielson to learn this and other creative recipes using the local ingredients.

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